Raw Food Diets for Cats and Dogs

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diet & Nutrition

Most pet owners feed their pets traditionally-prepared commercial food. Due in part to the recent pet food recall, more people are turning to home-prepared diets for their pets. Some individuals are now advocating raw meat diets that may be prepared at home or are commercially available.

Lyme Disease or Borreliosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Horses, Cows, Diseases

In the United States, Lyme Borreliosis is the most commonly-reported tick-transmitted disease in humans. Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi which is a spirochete (corkscrew-shaped bacteria) that is transmitted by various Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is also seen in Europe, Asia, South America, Africa and Australia.

Tularemia or Rabbit Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Diseases, Rabbits

A disease first described in a California ground squirrel around 1913, tularemia is also known as "rabbit" or "deerfly fever". The disease is caused by a gram-negative bacterium by the name of "Francisella tularensis". The bacterial septicemia may affect over 50 different species of wild and domestic mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and even man.

Milk Thistle: Treating Chronic Liver Problems and Diabetes

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Is your dog or cat suffering from liver failure, or have you just found out there is an elevation in their liver enzyme levels? Milk thistle, or an extract thereof, may prove to be helpful. In fact, milk thistle may help with that case of pancreatitis or diabetes. Milk thistle has also been found to have protective properties in those animals receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatments. In addition, milk thistle may slow down or stop the growth of certain tumors.

Rift Valley Fever

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases

Endemic to Madagascar, eastern, and southern Africa is an RNA disease causing virus named for the area in which it was first reported in 1930 called Rift Valley Fever (RVF). The virus has since been detected as far north as Egypt and over to the Arabian Peninsula countries of Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Although an important pathogen in its native area affecting domestic ruminants and people, RVF is feared as a potential biological weapon capable of spreading the globe by the movement of infected people, animals, and insects.

Lead Poisoning in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

According to both the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, pets are more likely to exceed recommended levels of lead exposure through household contamination rather than by pet toys. Pets and children may be exposed to lead contained in consumer products like lead sinkers used to weigh down fishing lines, the consumption of old paint chips, linoleum, certain paints used by artists, or the inhalation of lead dust when surfaces of older homes are scraped or sanded.

Vesicular Stomatitis in Horses, Cows, and Pigs

Filed Under: Horses, Cows, Diseases, Pigs

Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a viral disease of horses, cattle and swine that produces characteristic lesions known as vesicles and erosions. After a short incubation period of anywhere from 3 to 15 days, affected animals will have an elevated temperature, appear lethargic (depressed) and anorexic, and often exhibit drooling of saliva (ptyalism) and lameness.

Heartwater or Cowdriosis in Cattle, Sheep, and Goats

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases

Heartwater or Cowdriosis is a disease of cattle, sheep, goats and wild ruminants endemic to Sub-Sahara Africa, Madagascar, and portions of the Caribbean such as Antigua and Guadeloupe. Heartwater is caused by obligate intracellular rickettsial organisms that parasitize macrophages (a type of white blood cell). After initially replicating in macrophages, the organism will move to the vascular endothelium where it undergoes additional replication.

Fescue Toxicosis in Cattle

Filed Under: Cows, Poisoning

Tall fescue (Festuca elatior or F. arundinace) is among the most common cool season pasture grasses grown in North America and in other countries having a temperate climate. Almost all of the pasture planted before 1980 is infected with Neotyphodium coenophialum, a microscopic fungus or endophyte. "Endophyte" describes the location of the fungal growth within the grass as endo=within and phyte=plant.

Rose Hair Tarantulas or Chilean Rose Hair

Filed Under: General Care

Capable of calmly walking over the hands of screaming, squirrelly kids without being fazed, the Chilean rose hair or rose hair tarantula (Grammastola rosea) is one of the calmest and hardiest tarantulas in the pet trade. This particular spider can be a wonderful ambassador to introduce people to the wonderful world of invertebrates (animals without a backbone). The rose hair tarantula’s natural habitat is the desert and scrub regions of Chile, Bolivia, and Argentina.

Dr. Susan named best vet in Northeast Alabama!

Critterology.com's primary contributor, Dr. Susan Muller Esneault, has been named for best veterinarian in northeast Alabama!

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Thanks to everyone who voted.