Feline Calicivirus

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline Calicivirus (FCV) is an important and common cause of Upper Respiratory Infection (URD) and oral disease in cats. This virus occurs worldwide with various strains that vary greatly in virulence (the ability to produce disease). Clinical disease may vary from subclinical (not clinically apparent) to combinations of oral, respiratory disease, and lameness. There are more than 40 strains of FCV, one of which may have high mortality rates and is referred to as the virulent systemic (VS), or the hemorrhagic form of FCV.

Histiocytomas

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Histiocytomas are benign, fast-growing, raised, hairless skin tumors found on the extremities, head, ears, and neck. Histiocytomas account for 3 to 14% of skin tumors occurring in the dog. Typically these lesions are round and less than three cm in diameter. These tumors occur most commonly in young dogs. Boxers, Dachshunds, Cocker spaniels, Great Danes, Shetland sheepdogs and Bull terriers are especially susceptible to histiocytomas. Often these tumors will resolve spontaneously within three months and may be multiple.

Fleas

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Cows, Parasites

Fleas are small, wingless insects with mouth parts that are specifically adapted to piercing the skin and sucking blood. There are greater than 1,600 species of fleas present worldwide. Roughly 95% of flea species will live on mammals and about 50% will live on birds. Most flea infections in the US are due to Ctenocephalides felis which is more commonly known as the cat flea. C. felis affect more than 50 different mammalian and avian hosts throughout the world. In the U.S., the most common hosts are domestic and wild mammals including cats, dogs, cattle, and man.

Coccidiosis in Cattle

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases, Parasites

Coccidiosis in cattle is caused by the protozoan parasites Eimeria bovis, Eimeria zuernii, and Eimeria auburnensis. Coccidia are intracellular parasites of many organs and tissues in cattle.

Toxoplasma

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases, Parasites

Toxoplasmosis is caused by an organism called Toxoplasma gondii which is a type of protozoan. This particular protozoan is an intracellular parasite of many organs and tissues of birds and mammals, including man. The only known definitive or complete hosts are wild and domestic Felidae or cats. This means that only in infected cats will the entire life cycle of this parasite be completed. The cat is the only animal which will shed and thereby spread oocysts (eggs) in their feces.

Infection can be obtained in one of three ways:

Care of Neonatal Squirrels

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, General Care

Raising baby squirrels can be a rewarding experience. Most baby squirrels do well when you follow some basic rules. Baby animals are not usually able to maintain body temperature and need to warm up to an additional heat source. Hypothermia is the primary cause of death in an immature squirrel. When confronted with a baby squirrel, the first step should be to warm them quickly and gently. A hot water bottle is the safest heat source and can be easily constructed from a couple empty plastic soda bottles. Fill the bottle with hot water and wrap in a towel.

For Dogs, Not All Artificial Sweeteners are Created Equal

Filed Under: Dogs, Poisoning

Xylitol is a popular sugar substitute made from a sugar alcohol. Although Xylitol is considered to be safe when used as a sugar substitute for people, it may cause hypoglycemia and acute death of liver cells in dogs.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus or FIV

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus or FIV is a lentivirus that infects domestic cats and cheetahs. FIV is the cause of feline AIDS but is not the same virus as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the cause of human AIDS.

The prevalence of FIV in domestic cats in North America is estimated to be at a 6% level regardless of whether the cat is owned or feral.

Approximately 15% of cats that test positive for Feline Leukemia (FeLV) also test positive for FIV.

Euthanasia

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Reptiles, Horses, General Care, Pigs, Birds

One of the most difficult decisions an animal owner will ever make is when to euthanize a pet. Most owners want to do what is right for their pet and will agonize over the decision whether to euthanize or not. The only criterion that should be used in this difficult decision is if the quality of life is good enough to justify the quantity of life. With people, we do not have the luxury of keeping them from going through those last agonizing moments of life. We are kinder to animals.

Tetanus in Horses

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Tetanus is caused by a neurotoxin produced by club-shaped bacteria, known as Clostridium tetani. In the presence of oxygen or other adverse environmental conditions such as cold or a lack of humidity, this bacterium will produce a single inactive spore. The spore is a defense mechanism by which the bacteria are able to survive conditions that would result in their death.

Dr. Susan named best vet in Northeast Alabama!

Critterology.com's primary contributor, Dr. Susan Muller Esneault, has been named for best veterinarian in northeast Alabama!

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Thanks to everyone who voted.