Canine Separation Anxiety

Filed Under: Dogs, Behavioral & Training

In a natural environment the dog is a pack animal. When we bring a puppy into a human family the puppy naturally becomes part of a new pack—his adoptive human family. Unfortunately, the modern family is always on the go, and the new puppy is often left alone for long periods of time. It's unnatural for a dog to be isolated from his pack. The stress associated with isolation from the nuclear family can lead to a syndrome described as "Separation Anxiety."

West Nile Encephalomyelitis in the Horse

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases, Parasites

West Nile virus (WNV) is a flavivirus that was first identified in Africa during 1937. WNV is considered to be endemic in Africa, Asia, Southern Europe and North America. The virus first appeared in North America around the New York City area in 1999, when wild and zoo birds, horses and humans died of meningoencephalitis. WNV has been found in 225 different wild and captive bird species. Birds are the natural host and reservoir of this virus.

Canine Obesity

Filed Under: Dogs, Diet & Nutrition

Obesity is defined as an increase in body weight beyond optimal skeletal and physical requirement, as the result of an excessive accumulation of fat in the body. Obesity may be due to metabolic or internal (endocrine) abnormalities known as endogenous causes or exogenous obesity due to overeating. Exogenous obesity is the end result from an imbalance between calorie intake and the expenditure of energy used in day to day activities.

Hepatic Lipidosis and Liver Problems in Cats

Filed Under: Cats, Diet & Nutrition

The most common cause of liver problems in the cat is Hepatic Lipidosis. The exact cause of this condition is not known but it is associated with a period of anorexia (not eating) in the feline patient. Cats that are overweight or obese tend to incur the problem more frequently and repeat attacks are common. Stress appears to be the inciting cause of Hepatic Lipidosis. Stressful situations in the cat may include any change to their normal routine including: boarding, moving, the death of an additional pet or an owner, or simply a change in diet.

Rabies in Horses

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Rabies is a virus that may infect the central nervous system of any warm blooded animal. Rabies is typically spread by the saliva from infected animals. Horses are most likely to contract rabies by the bite of a wild carnivore, bats, or unvaccinated cats. Rabies is essentially 100% fatal once clinical signs attributed to the disease are exhibited.

In the year 2001 there were nearly 7,500 cases of rabies that were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. Of those cases, 51 were members of the Equine Family.

Canine Tapeworms

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Two types of tapeworm affect dogs, Dipylidium caninum and Taenia species. Dipylidium caninum is the more common type of tapeworm found in dogs and cats. Adult tapeworms are found in the small intestine of their host. These worms shed small segments, called proglottids (packets of 20 to 40 eggs) in the stool. Once in the environment, proglottids of the Dipylidium tapeworm are consumed by flea larvae. As the flea larva matures, the egg of the tapeworm eventually develops into its infective form called a cysticercoid. The dog or cat ingests the flea while grooming itself.

Heartworm Disease in the Cat

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Heartworms or Dirofilaria immitis are a spaghetti-type worm that will develop in the heart and lungs of an affected feline. Heartworm disease in cats was first reported in 1920’s both in Brazil and in the U.S. Domestic and exotic felines may all become infected. Heartworms affect male and female cats in equal numbers.

Ticks

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Ticks are essentially large mites that are covered with a leathery integument. A tick’s sole purpose is sucking blood from mammals, birds and reptiles, and then reproducing to provide the next generation. Ticks are not insects, but arachnids. An adult will have eight legs and three body segments. As arachnids, ticks are related to spiders, chiggers, scorpions and mites.

Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) or Swamp Fever is caused by a lentivirus of the family Retroviridae. This virus is transmitted primarily by blood-sucking insects, especially horseflies and deerflies. Transmission may also occur via contaminated syringes, surgical instruments or blood transfusions. Vertical transmission (transmission from mother to offspring) may occur transplacentally or via colostrum and nursing. The only known reservoirs of infection are members of the Equine Family. Virus replication does not occur in the insect vector.

The Chemistry Behind the Skunk Smell Remedy

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Reptiles, General Care

Paul Krebaum developed a skunk spray remedy from common household items through his knowledge of chemistry. Routinely used in the treatment of pets, his recipe is as follows:

  • 1 quart 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • ¼ cup baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon liquid soap (usually Dawn detergent is suggested)

Receptors in your nose are very sensitive to sulfur in a low oxidation state. These same receptors are not sensitive to sulfur in a high oxidation state.

Dr. Susan named best vet in Northeast Alabama!

Critterology.com's primary contributor, Dr. Susan Muller Esneault, has been named for best veterinarian in northeast Alabama!

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Thanks to everyone who voted.