A Good Guide to Iguanas

Filed Under: Reptiles, General Care, Iguanas

Iguanas are a very popular reptile pet. With very gradual introduction to handling, a young iguana can adapt well to human contact. Iguanas are fascinating to watch and, as a somewhat low-maintenance pet, they are popular with people who may not have the time or space to dedicate to a larger, more demanding animal. But that’s not to say that iguanas don’t need their share of care. A happy iguana is well-fed, well-housed and healthy.

Are all white-haired animals albinos?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Horses, General Care

Albinism—the lack of pigment melanin in the skin, hair and eyes—is present in most animal species, but many animals with white coats are not albinos.

Albinos have a complete lack of color pigment. Most animals with white coats have brown eyes, or possibly one blue and one brown eye. The skin around the eyelids and lips may be quite dark, even black.

Though it is generally obvious in their appearance, your veterinarian will tell you if your animal is a true albino.

I'd like to have a pet pig, but are they as dirty as they seem to be?

Filed Under: Pigs

Pet pigs, who often live indoors and are bathed regularly, are as clean as dogs or cats. Wild pigs or pigs who live on farms are obviously dirtier, but with good reason.

Caring for Your Pet Bird

Filed Under: General Care, Birds

If you’re looking to care for a pet bird, there are so many kinds you can adopt—one to talk to you, one to play with you, one to sing to you—that there’s bound to be a perfect bird out there for you. Every species of bird has special demands and characteristics, but all birds require proper care.

You may have to seek out a veterinarian familiar enough with birds to provide you with all the answers to your questions, as well as an effective annual check up. A general practice vet may recommend a bird specialist.

Making Your Hamster Comfortable

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Behavioral & Training

Hamsters who bite generally only do so because they are frightened or stressed. If they’re brought up from an early age with gentle handling, their timidness will often fade. Here are some tips on making your hamster more comfortable.

Your hamster will need to become acclimated to his new home, so let him do so for a few days. Spend some time around the cage and speak quietly to get him used to your voice.

What to Expect with Rabbits

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, General Care, Rabbits

Rabbits—social, playful and active—can be wonderful pets, as long as you know what to expect from them, and how to take care of them.

Which Small Mammal is the Right Pet for You?

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Gerbils, Guinea Pigs, Hamsters, Mice, Rats

Which small mammal will make the right pet for you? Here’s a short rundown of their specifications.

Hamsters

Golden hamsters live 2-3 years and grow to about 6 inches in length. As solitary animals, they should be kept alone in their cages. Hamsters are active pets and require large cages; a minimum size would be 12 x 12 x 18 inches, but a larger cage is recommended. Be sure to get the prerequisite hamster wheel to help them burn off some of their extensive energy.

The Itchy Patients

Filed Under: Dogs, Practice Stories

The slight woman moved into the exam room holding a small Maltese. You could tell from her appearance that she was in a struggle for life all her own. Mrs. Poole wore the characteristic turban of a cancer patient. The terry cloth turban that covered her head showed not a hint of any hair protruding from under its depth. Her eyes were sunken, with dark lines underneath and her skin was pale.

Making a Home for Fish

Filed Under: General Care, Fish

Fish are beautiful and peaceful pets, and in general are low-maintenance. However there are a few things you need to prepare before bringing your new fish home.

Due to an excess of chlorine and gases, most tap water is unsuitable for aquariums, and needs to be conditioned before introducing your fish. Conditioning, or aging, is done simply by letting the water stand in its tank for at least one week. This allows the water bacteria to strike its own balance, kills possible fish parasites, and lets organic particles settle out.

Your Rodent's Dental Health

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Chinchillas, Ferrets, General Care, Gerbils, Guinea Pigs, Hamsters, Mice, Rats

Small rodents have continually growing front teeth, worn down through normal chewing. If your rodent’s teeth are not wearing down naturally, it may be due to malocclusion. Malocclusion is a common dental disorder, found in rabbits and other small rodents, defined as abnormal contact between the maxillary (upper jaw) and mandibular (lower jaw) teeth. The misalignment of these teeth interferes with chewing. Causes of the misalignment include abnormal wear and tear—such as chewing on metal cages—or trauma to the teeth or head.

Dr. Susan named best vet in Northeast Alabama!

Critterology.com's primary contributor, Dr. Susan Muller Esneault, has been named for best veterinarian in northeast Alabama!

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Thanks to everyone who voted.