Heartworm Preventatives for Cats

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Currently there are two forms of heartworm preventative approved for use in the cat.

Heartworm Preventatives for Dogs

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Currently all heartworm products for dogs are given on a monthly basis. These should only be given to dogs who have been tested for heartworms and found to be free of disease. The cost of testing is nominal and only requires taking a blood sample. Most veterinary clinics will conduct the test in a hospital laboratory and have the results 8 to 10 minutes later.

Heartworm Disease in Dogs

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Heartworms can be a problem anywhere mosquitoes inhabit. This disease syndrome is especially prevalent in Florida and the other Gulf Coast States. Due to their mild climate, these states are pestered by mosquitoes year round.

Cats - Outdoor Life vs. Indoor Safety

Filed Under: Cats, General Care

While many cat owners consider their pets "outside cats," the fact is that cats kept indoors are much safer and healthier than their outdoor counterparts.

Free-roaming cats are bound to come in contact with other cats. Parasites, like fleas or ringworm, can be transmitted through these interactions, as well as communicable and infectious diseases—feline leukemia, feline infectious peritonitis, upper respiratory infections and even feline immunodeficiency virus.

Moving With Your Dog?

Filed Under: Dogs, General Care

Before making a big move, check with your new local municipal office and find out if there are any regulations or by-laws that could affect your canine companions.

Check first to see if there is any type of breed ban in effect in your new location. Certain dog breeds may be prohibited altogether by neighborhood or homeowners' associations. You may be required to hold a special license or have your dog muzzled at all times. Breed regulations may also dictate the type of outdoor enclosure or fencing required to contain your dog

Tainted Pet Food Recall

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

On 17 March 2007, Menu Foods recalled 90 brands of dog and cat foods after 16 pet deaths were reported and countless animals became sick. The international recall covered 60 million packages of "cuts and gravy" pet food sold in cans and pouches.

The Food and Drug Adminstration's official count of cats and dogs that have become fatally ill from eating the contaminated food stands at 16. It is unclear how many deaths will eventually be linked to the recalled food, but is it expected more will be announced.

Living with Cat Allergies

Filed Under: Cats, General Care

Don't let your cat allergies get the best of you! There are several ways to lessen the effect of cat dander in your home.

Inside the home:

- If you're only considering taking a cat home, shorthaired cats generally have less dander to reckon with.
- Curtains, drapes and full carpeting hold dander in. Consider trading these for blinds and hardwood floors with rugs.
- Invest in a vacuum with a good filter, and vacuum all soft surfaces regularly.
- An air purification system definitely makes a difference.

Your Dog's Dental Health

Filed Under: Dogs, General Care

More pet owners pay attention to dental health than ever before. Dog owners now commonly brush their canine companions’ teeth--and fret over bad breath. But this isn't just an aesthetic interest: all dog owners should be aware of the importance of dentistry to our pets' overall health.

What is feline asthma and how can it be treated?

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects one percent of all adult cats. It is characterized by recurrent and sudden attacks of dyspnea (difficult breathing), and is caused by a spasmodic contraction of the bronchi.

Symptoms you may notice include wheezing, labored breathing, coughing, and frantic attempts to obtain air. Cat coughing sounds more like a hairball being passed than a human cough. The disease can be caused by allergies, smoke, inhalation of small particles, or bacterial infections. Feline asthma is also a common side affect of heartworms.

How to Get Rid of that Skunk Stink

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, General Care

Although skunks are lovable animals, we all know they have a very specific odor, and it's generally not pleasant. What do you do when a skunk leaves its mark on your pet? A few standard household products will take care of it.

The standard home recipe for the elimination of skunk spray is as follows:

1 quart of hydrogen peroxide
½ cup baking soda
drop of liquid dish detergent

The resulting solution will foam. Wash the offending area with the solution and rinse clean with warm water. Make sure you do not get the solution in your pet’s eyes.

Dr. Susan named best vet in Northeast Alabama!

Critterology.com's primary contributor, Dr. Susan Muller Esneault, has been named for best veterinarian in northeast Alabama!

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Thanks to everyone who voted.