Dogs

Christmas Cactus

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

It is just a few short weeks before the Christmas holidays. Your best friend sends you a beautiful Christmas cactus to accent the season. Unfortunately your pets decide that the colorful flowers of your holiday plant are truly irresistible. Your dog, with the help of the family cat, uses the plant as a newly acquired play toy and disassembles the Christmas cactus while you are at work. Should you be concerned that some of the flat segments which comprise the Christmas cactus found their way into your pet’s stomach? Probably not!

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Filed Under: Dogs, General Care

The Chesapeake Bay retriever is a native of Maryland in the United States. This water dog evolved with the breeding of Newfoundlands and English Otter Hounds with local retrievers, including curly-coated and flat-coated retrievers, back in the early 1800’s.

The breed was developed for its keen intelligence and a willingness to retrieve no matter how harsh the weather or how icy the water. This breed is considered to be the toughest of the water retrievers. They are named for the Chesapeake Bay area from which they hail.

Adverse Drug Reactions in Herding Breeds of Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, General Care

Do you own a collie or an Australian shepherd?  Have you been cautioned that they may be particularly sensitive to certain drugs, or have you heard not to give them certain medications?

Greyhounds

Filed Under: Dogs, General Care

Tall, lean, and built for speed, the greyhound is the fastest breed of dog.  With a sharp eye it is classified as a sight hound.  Originally bred as a racing dog they are now accepted as sweet and personable companions.  As part of the hound family they can have some stubborn personality traits.  They are not hyper and will spend much of their day resting in preparation, conserving their energy, until required to utilize their great bursts of speed. 
 

Canine Osteosarcoma

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Does your dog have a swelling of the leg that is painful when touched?   Is your dog suddenly lame?  Can’t remember a traumatic incidence your pet has been subjected to recently?   Is your dog over 50 pounds in weight?  If the answer to most of these questions is yes, you should take your pet to his veterinarian.   Large and giant breeds of dogs are particularly susceptible to osteosarcoma which is a highly aggressive and malignant tumor or cancer of the bone.  Radiographs will clearly demonstrate if you have to be concerned about this type of tumor.

Top Ten Reasons for Owning a Pond

Filed Under: Dogs, General Care, Fish

10. Provides the family Labrador retriever a place to cool off.

9. Less water usage. Lawns and landscaping require watering. Often rainwater is sufficient to top off a pond once it has been filled, dependent on the area of the country.

8. The pond provides a wonderful local wildlife habitat.

7. Sludge collected by a pond filter may be used as a nutrient-rich fertilizer.

6. Just add fish and you have wonderful, easy to care for and entertaining pets.

5. A pond encourages young people to help preserve the planet and brings them in close contact with nature.

Tick Control in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Top Dogs for 2008

Filed Under: Dogs, Behavioral & Training, General Care

In the United States, the most popular breeds have all remained the same for 2008 according to the AKC. For the 18th consecutive year the Labrador retriever has maintained the coveted number one most popular breed ranking, although rumor has it that the mixed breed actually edges them out for the number one spot. In fact the Labrador retriever has twice the number of registrants in ‘08 than does its nearest competition: the Yorkshire terrier.

The 2008 ranking resembles that of 2007 with the exception of the English bulldog, who has managed to move up an additional two slots.

Gone Fishing

The summer was beginning to drag on further. The heat and humidity were relentless. It was the type of day that the air was so humid you could cut it with a knife. No one was moving, or should I say, they moved as little as possible. Most clients and their pets confined their activities around air conditioned areas. Unfortunately, cold air blowing directly on arthritic joints is not what a pet suffering from degenerative disease needs.

Why Do Dogs and Cats Eat Grass?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Behavioral & Training, Diet & Nutrition, General Care

The age old question for pet owners has been, “Why do dogs, who are largely carnivores, and cats, who are obligate carnivores, eat grass?”  Dogs and cats receive no nutritive value from grass.  So why do they consume greens, typically grasses?  Traditionally veterinarians and behaviorists have theorized that these pets are sick and need to vomit or have some perceived dietary deficiency that perhaps the owner is unaware of.  The answer may be more fundamental:  eating grass may be a necessary inherited predisposition of dogs and cats from their wild ancestors.  

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