Dogs

Are Pets Appropriate Gifts?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, General Care, Birds, Fish

Are pets appropriate gifts for the holidays? The answer to this should always be yes, but unfortunately this question is often tragically answered, no! Pets make wonderful companions. They enrich our lives and are always there for us. Where else are you going to find an individual that is always in a good mood and glad to see you? These wonderful critters are devoted and loyal. Yet they are dependent on us for everything, thereby creating an awesome responsibility.

Chocolate Toxicosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

Think giving your pet chocolate is a suitable treat? Unfortunately, chocolate is toxic in dogs and many other species of animals. Most cases of poisoning involve dogs due to readily available sources of chocolate. In fact, consumption of chocolate is the 7th most common toxicosis in the dog. Dogs are infamous for getting into bags of chocolate morsels, a box of candy left on the coffee table, or the infamous Easter basket. Toxicities and death have also been reported in livestock when cocoa byproducts or mulch from cocoa-bean hulls were fed.

Mistletoe Poisoning

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diet & Nutrition, Poisoning

As much as we may like to kiss under mistletoe, we humans don’t usually eat it. But our pets may have other ideas.

Poinsettias: Pretty or Poisonous?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

Thinking of throwing out that poinsettia the florist just delivered since you have pets in the house? That is probably not necessary. Although poinsettia poisoning has gained a lot of press, they are not all that toxic.

Poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) are also known as the "Christmas flower" or "star". They are a popular plant used as decoration around the holidays from November through December. The plant is actually a shrub and has brightly colored red, white or pink terminal leaves while the lower leaves remain green in color.

Canine Roundworms

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

The canine roundworm or Toxocara canis is the most common parasite seen throughout the U.S. Roundworms are a spaghetti-type worm that are passed out in the stool. The occurrence of roundworms is especially common in young puppies and their nursing mothers.

Symptoms of infection include mucoid diarrhea, stunted growth, and an unthrifty coat. The most characteristic symptom is that of a pot-bellied appearance. Less commonly pneumonia, intestinal obstruction and even death may occur. Pneumonia may result from the third stage larva that migrates through the lungs.

Michael Vick and the Problem of Dog Fighting

Filed Under: Dogs, Practice Stories

Finally there is an issue that unanimously crosses partisan lines: the issue of dog fighting. Atlanta Falcons Quarterback, Michael Vick, has forced society to confront this sinister practice head on.

Marijuana Poisoning in Pets

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Horses, Poisoning

There's been plenty of debate about whether marijuana is harmful to humans. But it is definitely harmful to your pet.

Marijuana or cannabis, also known as hemp, marihuana, hashish, Mary Jane, grass, reefer, weed or pot is a coarse annual herb that may grow up to six feet tall. The leaves are palmated, compounded with three to seven linear, coarsely dentated leaves. Male plants have small green flowers at the tip while female pants have flowers along the entire length of branch.

Top 10 Reasons "Safe" Pets Get Heartworms

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Reptiles, Parasites

10) Being unaware that cats and ferrets as well as dogs may become infected with heartworms.

9) Being in denial that there are mosquitos in your area.

8) Having a pet that refuses to take oral medication even if it is disguised as a treat.

7) Using a topical heartworm preventative and then bathing your pet frequently with harsh shampoos that strip the medication from the coat.

6) Skipping one or more doses of heartworm preventative.

Tick Paralysis

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites, Pigs

Ticks in North America may cause an acute flaccid paralysis. Engorged female ticks are believed to secrete a neurotoxin that prevents the release of acetylcholine and thereby causes a paralysis of skeletal muscles. Acetylcholine is a necessary neurotransmitter for skeletal muscle contraction. When acetylchole is absent, the result is loss of motor control. This paralysis begins in the hind legs and will progress to the front end of the patient within 24 - 48 hours and is therefore termed an ascending paralysis.

Canine Brucellosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Canine brucellosis is caused by Brucella canis. B. Canis is a gram-negative, intracellular bacterium. Dogs are also susceptible to infection with Brucella abortus (the Brucella bacterium infecting cattle) and Brucella suis (the Brucella species infecting pigs).

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