Ferrets

Ferret Influenza, or Ferret Flu

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Have you been feeling under the weather lately? Running a temperature, feeling achy and coughing? You may be suffering from the flu. If it is indeed the flu, you might not want to socialize with your ferret buddies. Ferrets are extremely sensitive to the influenza viruses, both types A and B, as well as the swine flu or H1N1 variety.

The Do-It-Yourselfer

I have always had clients who would try to treat their animals before seeking assistance from a veterinarian. Most of these people would worm their pets with over-the-counter wormers, and sometimes a brave soul would venture out and purchase a vaccine from the local Co-op or Tractor Supply Company. Most of the wormers don’t do any harm, but they rarely do much good either. These wormers are lucky to kill a couple of roundworms and not much else.

Heartworm Disease in the Ferret

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets, Parasites

Heartworms or Dirofilaria immitis are a spaghetti-type worm that develop in the heart and lungs of an infected host. The disease is transmitted by the bite of a mosquito. Due to the insect vector, disease is more common in mild, moist climates. Mosquitos appear to infect ferrets with heartworms at a similar rate as seen in the dog.

Ferret Adrenal Gland Disease

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Is your ferret losing hair and has skin that appears to be normal? Your pet may be suffering from ferret adrenal gland disease.

Helicobacter Gastritis and Ulcers in the Ferret

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Ferrets are often kept as laboratory animals for the study of Helicobacter mustelae, a bacterium implicated in the development of gastritis and ulcers. Helicobacter species of bacteria have been implicated in disease production in various animals and man. Disease is usually associated with stress.

Stressful situations for the ferret may involve the introduction of a new ferret or pet to the home, moving to a new home, or lack of exercise and playtime when a ferret is constantly kenneled.

Lack of Sex in a Female Ferret Can Be Deadly!

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Ferrets, General Care

Female ferrets reach sexual maturity at 4-8 months of age, typically in their first spring following birth.Female ferrets undergoing their first heat cycle may prove it to be their last heat cycle unless spayed or bred.Ferrets are induced ovulators.Induced ovulation refers to the fact that the female ferret will remain in heat or estrus until such time that they are bred or are artificially stimulated to ovulate.

General Ferret Husbandry

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Ferrets, General Care

The scientific name for the ferret is Mustela putorius furo, which literally translates to “stinky thief.” The scientific name is thought to refer to the ferret’s musky odor and mischievous nature. Ferrets are classified in the family Mustelidae. As a member of this family they are closely related to mink, skunks, weasels and otters.

Caring for Ferrets

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Ferrets, General Care

Ferrets are playful and energetic, and bond well with their human friends. Some ferret caregivers compare ferrets to cats, but a ferret is in general much more energetic than your average cat. In some states in the U.S., owning a ferret is illegal. If you’re thinking of bringing a ferret into your home, check first to find out if any state or local laws prohibit you from keeping a ferret.

Your Rodent's Dental Health

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Chinchillas, Ferrets, General Care, Gerbils, Guinea Pigs, Hamsters, Mice, Rats

Small rodents have continually growing front teeth, worn down through normal chewing. If your rodent’s teeth are not wearing down naturally, it may be due to malocclusion. Malocclusion is a common dental disorder, found in rabbits and other small rodents, defined as abnormal contact between the maxillary (upper jaw) and mandibular (lower jaw) teeth. The misalignment of these teeth interferes with chewing. Causes of the misalignment include abnormal wear and tear—such as chewing on metal cages—or trauma to the teeth or head.

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