Diseases

Ferret Adrenal Gland Disease

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Is your ferret losing hair and has skin that appears to be normal? Your pet may be suffering from ferret adrenal gland disease.

Mouth Rot or Infectious Stomatitis in Reptiles

Filed Under: Reptiles, Diseases

Inflammation of the tissues in the mouth is defined as infectious stomatitis, more commonly known as mouth rot. The initiating cause may be stress or trauma, both of which lead to an infection of the oral cavity by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria. Common types of bacteria isolated from this area include Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Klebsiella, and Salmonella. In some cases, mycobacteria, and some species of fungi, or some viruses may also become involved.

Helicobacter Gastritis and Ulcers in the Ferret

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Ferrets are often kept as laboratory animals for the study of Helicobacter mustelae, a bacterium implicated in the development of gastritis and ulcers. Helicobacter species of bacteria have been implicated in disease production in various animals and man. Disease is usually associated with stress.

Stressful situations for the ferret may involve the introduction of a new ferret or pet to the home, moving to a new home, or lack of exercise and playtime when a ferret is constantly kenneled.

Feline Leukemia Virus

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline Leukemia is a retrovirus. As a member of the retrovirus family, the feline leukemia virus’s genetic material is transmitted as RNA. Once the virus infects the cell, DNA copies of the virus are transcribed and these copies are inserted randomly into the host’s genetic material. Once the DNA is integrated within the genome, any cell division that occurs will cause both of the new cells to contain the virus.

Foot and Mouth Disease

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases, Pigs

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) is a highly infections viral disease of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, buffalo, deer, antelope, elephant and giraffe. Old world camels are resistant to natural infection while new world camelids such as alpacas and llamas are susceptible to infection. Other animals that may become infected include nutrias, capybaras, hedgehogs, rats, mice and armadillos.

Canine Brucellosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Canine brucellosis is caused by Brucella canis. B. Canis is a gram-negative, intracellular bacterium. Dogs are also susceptible to infection with Brucella abortus (the Brucella bacterium infecting cattle) and Brucella suis (the Brucella species infecting pigs).

Babesiosis in Dogs or Piroplasmoses

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases, Parasites

Babesia canis is an intracellular protozoan parasite that affects red blood cells (erythrocytes) of the dog. There are 73 identified species of which two infect dogs. These parasites are all spread by ticks, usually of the Ixodid family which are also known as hard ticks. Babesia species are typically host specific, indicating that they will not infect more than one vertebrate species. Babesia gibsoni and Babesia canis are the two species that generally infect dogs.

Feline Herpesvirus-1 (Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis)

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline Herpesvirus (FHV-1), also known as Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR), is an important cause of upper respiratory disease (URD) and eye inflammation in cats and other members of the cat family worldwide. FHV-1 is an alphaherpesvirus which contains double-stranded DNA.

It is likely that most cats will be exposed to the infection during their lifetime. There is only one serotype of the virus and all isolates are genetically similar.

Feline Calicivirus

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline Calicivirus (FCV) is an important and common cause of Upper Respiratory Infection (URD) and oral disease in cats. This virus occurs worldwide with various strains that vary greatly in virulence (the ability to produce disease). Clinical disease may vary from subclinical (not clinically apparent) to combinations of oral, respiratory disease, and lameness. There are more than 40 strains of FCV, one of which may have high mortality rates and is referred to as the virulent systemic (VS), or the hemorrhagic form of FCV.

Histiocytomas

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Histiocytomas are benign, fast-growing, raised, hairless skin tumors found on the extremities, head, ears, and neck. Histiocytomas account for 3 to 14% of skin tumors occurring in the dog. Typically these lesions are round and less than three cm in diameter. These tumors occur most commonly in young dogs. Boxers, Dachshunds, Cocker spaniels, Great Danes, Shetland sheepdogs and Bull terriers are especially susceptible to histiocytomas. Often these tumors will resolve spontaneously within three months and may be multiple.

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