Parasites

Cuterebra

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Has your dog or cat suddenly developed a nickel to quarter sized lump along the trunk (side)? Is your pet irritating the site further or excessively grooming the site? If the cyst contains a circular hole in it, you may be dealing with a parasite called Cuterebra or the warble worm.

Chytrid: a Deadly Fungus Threatens Endangered Amphibians

Filed Under: Reptiles, Parasites

The chytrid fungus, whose scientific name is Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is decimating amphibian populations worldwide, especially in Central America and Australia. The fungus has contributed to the extinction of nine frog species native to Australia and almost 200 species worldwide. When B. dendrobatidis affects a community, up to a 50% morbidity rate is seen in the native amphibian population and 80% of the affected animals will die within a one year period (mortality rate).

Ear Mites in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Is your cat or dog constantly scratching at its ears or shaking its head? Do the ears contain a dark brown to black crusty discharge that resembles coffee grounds, yet has a waxy consistency? Does your pet have a hot spot below one of its ears? Then your cat or dog could be suffering from an infestation secondary to an infectious mite called Otodectes cynotis, more commonly referred to as ear mites.

Tick Control in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Feline Lungworms

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Has your cat been coughing lately?  Have you noticed weight loss in your pet or periods with difficulty breathing?  You may be dealing with a parasitic infection rather than a respiratory disease, feline heartworms, or feline asthma.  Any cat with clinical signs of respiratory disease that is over 3 months of age should be screened for the feline lungworm, or Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, which is a nematode (type of roundworm) capable of infecting the lungs of cats. 
 

Ear Mites in the Rabbit (Psoroptes cuniculi)

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Parasites, Rabbits

Do you have a rabbit that is constantly scratching at her ears? Do the ears look red and irritated? Are there big flakes of crusted material on the inside of your rabbit’s ears? Then you could be dealing with a common parasite in rabbits seen worldwide, the rabbit ear mite, also known as Psoroptes cuniculi.

These mites are easily identified on microscopic examination.

Hookworms in the Dog

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Is your puppy anemic? Does he appear to be losing weight, and is the hair coat dull and thinning? Have you noticed that your dog’s bowel movements are dark and tarry? Then your pet may be suffering from a hookworm infection.

Hookworms are small thread-like worms that suck blood from the small intestinal tract of infected pets. The most common types of hookworms infecting dogs include Ancylostoma caninum, Ancylostoma braziliense, and Uncinaria stenocephala.

Demodicosis, Demodectic Mange or Red Mange

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Does your dog have patchy areas of hair loss, especially around the head and front legs? Are the affected skin areas red and irritated? Is your dog under two years of age? Then your pet could be suffering from demodectic mange.

Wolbachia and Their Role in Heartworm Disease and Treatment

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases, Parasites

Does your dog have heartworms or Dirofilaria immitis? There is a long list of complications that may occur as a result of heartworm disease or in the treatment thereof. New research has shown that a gram-negative intracellular bacterium by the name of Wolbachia may be responsible for many of these complications and side-effects.

Whipworms in the Dog

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Does your dog have bloody diarrhea? Make sure your veterinarian does multiple fecal samples to check for whipworms or Trichuris vulpis. The eggs of Trichuris are not as buoyant as the eggs of many other parasite species, often necessitating special procedures to confirm a diagnosis. These thread-like inhabitants of the cecum have a bad habit of causing anemia, dehydration, and even death in addition to bloody diarrhea. A recent study determined that 14.3% of the canine population may be infected.

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