Parasites

Holistic Flea Control Strategies

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Did you know that vacuuming can be detrimental to the fleas in your pet’s environment? Cleaning the house may actually help you destroy pests. Ohio State University has studied the effects of vacuuming on the most common flea plaguing pets, the cat flea. Their study revealed that 96 percent of adult fleas and 100 % of younger fleas (pupae and larvae stages) were destroyed after passing through a vacuum cleaner.

Pets and Flea Prevention

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Adult fleas are wingless, blood-sucking, external parasites of warm-blooded animals. The cat flea is the most common in the Southeast. It has more than fifty hosts, including domestic cats, dogs, opossums, cattle, skunks, squirrels, and the house mouse. From egg to adult, the cat flea can live up to twenty months indoors.

Distribution in the home

Habits of pets affect the distribution of fleas inside the house. Flea larvae are found primarily in carpeting near an area where a pet spends time sleeping or resting.
Suitable infestation sites:

Cheyletiella or Walking Dandruff in Dogs

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Is your dog scratching, does he have bad dandruff, is he rubbing his eyes or sneezing? Does that dandruff appear to be moving? Then Cheyletiella yasquri, a large mite that parasitizes dogs, could be the source of your problem.

The Cheyletiella yasquri mite is so large that it may appear visible to the naked eye. Although primarily a parasite of dogs, Cheyletiella species are not host-specific and cross-infections with cats, rabbits, and foxes are not uncommon.

Heartworms in the Feline Patient

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Are there mosquitoes in your area? Have you ever been bitten by a mosquito? One mosquito bite and your cat can be affected by heartworm disease. It is just that easy for your cat to obtain this life-threatening infection. Fortunately, heartworm disease is completely preventable, yet less than 4% of the cats in the United States are given heartworm preventative on a regular basis.

Heartworm Disease in the Ferret

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets, Parasites

Heartworms or Dirofilaria immitis are a spaghetti-type worm that develop in the heart and lungs of an infected host. The disease is transmitted by the bite of a mosquito. Due to the insect vector, disease is more common in mild, moist climates. Mosquitos appear to infect ferrets with heartworms at a similar rate as seen in the dog.

Feline Roundworms or Toxocara Cati

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

The feline roundworm or Toxocara cati is the most common parasite seen throughout the U.S. in cats. Roundworms are a spaghetti-type worm typically found in the intestines of infected felines. Roundworms are especially common in young kittens and their nursing mothers.

Canine Roundworms

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

The canine roundworm or Toxocara canis is the most common parasite seen throughout the U.S. Roundworms are a spaghetti-type worm that are passed out in the stool. The occurrence of roundworms is especially common in young puppies and their nursing mothers.

Symptoms of infection include mucoid diarrhea, stunted growth, and an unthrifty coat. The most characteristic symptom is that of a pot-bellied appearance. Less commonly pneumonia, intestinal obstruction and even death may occur. Pneumonia may result from the third stage larva that migrates through the lungs.

Top 10 Reasons "Safe" Pets Get Heartworms

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Reptiles, Parasites

10) Being unaware that cats and ferrets as well as dogs may become infected with heartworms.

9) Being in denial that there are mosquitos in your area.

8) Having a pet that refuses to take oral medication even if it is disguised as a treat.

7) Using a topical heartworm preventative and then bathing your pet frequently with harsh shampoos that strip the medication from the coat.

6) Skipping one or more doses of heartworm preventative.

Tick Paralysis

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites, Pigs

Ticks in North America may cause an acute flaccid paralysis. Engorged female ticks are believed to secrete a neurotoxin that prevents the release of acetylcholine and thereby causes a paralysis of skeletal muscles. Acetylcholine is a necessary neurotransmitter for skeletal muscle contraction. When acetylchole is absent, the result is loss of motor control. This paralysis begins in the hind legs and will progress to the front end of the patient within 24 - 48 hours and is therefore termed an ascending paralysis.

Babesiosis in Dogs or Piroplasmoses

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases, Parasites

Babesia canis is an intracellular protozoan parasite that affects red blood cells (erythrocytes) of the dog. There are 73 identified species of which two infect dogs. These parasites are all spread by ticks, usually of the Ixodid family which are also known as hard ticks. Babesia species are typically host specific, indicating that they will not infect more than one vertebrate species. Babesia gibsoni and Babesia canis are the two species that generally infect dogs.

Syndicate content