abdominal pain

Canine Parvovirus

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Worried about the “New Parvovirus?”  Don’t be!  If your pet is adequately vaccinated for parvovirus, then they will be covered for the newer strain.  If your dog is not vaccinated for parvovirus, they can become infected with any strain of parvovirus, regardless of age.  So if your dog has not been vaccinated in the past year for parvovirus, see your veterinarian today!  Don’t delay!  It could mean the difference between the life and death for your four-legged friends.

Lead Poisoning in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

According to both the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, pets are more likely to exceed recommended levels of lead exposure through household contamination rather than by pet toys. Pets and children may be exposed to lead contained in consumer products like lead sinkers used to weigh down fishing lines, the consumption of old paint chips, linoleum, certain paints used by artists, or the inhalation of lead dust when surfaces of older homes are scraped or sanded.

Grape and Raisin Toxicosis in the Dog

Filed Under: Dogs, Diet & Nutrition, Poisoning

Think grapes may be nutritionally good for your dog? Guess again! Raisins and grapes may be part of a nutritionally complete diet for people but can result in acute renal failure in susceptible dogs. The consumption of 11 to 30 grams of grapes per kilogram of body weight will result in clinical signs of toxicosis, and around 32 grams per kilogram will result in renal (kidney) damage. The number of raisins required to induce poisoning will be even less, requiring a dose of only 0.16 to 0.7 oz of raisins per kilogram of body weight resulting in poisoning.

Chocolate Toxicosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

Think giving your pet chocolate is a suitable treat? Unfortunately, chocolate is toxic in dogs and many other species of animals. Most cases of poisoning involve dogs due to readily available sources of chocolate. In fact, consumption of chocolate is the 7th most common toxicosis in the dog. Dogs are infamous for getting into bags of chocolate morsels, a box of candy left on the coffee table, or the infamous Easter basket. Toxicities and death have also been reported in livestock when cocoa byproducts or mulch from cocoa-bean hulls were fed.

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