fever

Canine Flu or Canine Influenza Virus (CIV)

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Think your dog may have a bad case of Infectious Tracheobronchitis? You may not be dealing with a run-of-the-mill kennel cough. Canine Influenza 1 virus, or CIV, has become an important emerging infectious disease in dogs. The virus responsible for the condition is H3N8 influenza A virus.

Ferret Influenza, or Ferret Flu

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Have you been feeling under the weather lately? Running a temperature, feeling achy and coughing? You may be suffering from the flu. If it is indeed the flu, you might not want to socialize with your ferret buddies. Ferrets are extremely sensitive to the influenza viruses, both types A and B, as well as the swine flu or H1N1 variety.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Is your pet suddenly lame when you have seen no indication of trauma?  Have you recently removed ticks from your pet or are you late on your tick treatment this month?  Has your dog had any abnormal bleeding or are his joints swollen or painful?  Then you may want to consider the possibility that your dog could be suffering from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

Malignant Catarrhal Fever or Bovine Malignant Catarrh

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases

Malignant Catarrhal Fever (MCF) or Bovine Malignant Catarrh are actually two diseases caused by separate herpes viruses that are almost always fatal to cattle, deer, bison, occasionally pigs, rabbits, and certain exotic ruminants. Neither virus causes disease in their principal hosts, either the wildebeest or the sheep.

Cat Scratch Fever or Cat Scratch Disease (CSD)

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Cat scratch fever or disease (CSD) is a bacterial infection caused by Bartonella henselae. Bartonella are a group of gram-negative bacteria that parasitize erythrocytes (red blood cells or RBCs) of the host and are transmitted by arthropods. Most people infected with cat scratch fever have been previously bitten or scratched by a cat. Cat bites are less frequently implemented in transmission than are scratches.

Canine Anaplasmosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Has your dog suddenly developed an anemia or lameness?  Have you had a problem controlling ticks this summer?  Then your pet may be suffering from an infection called anaplasmosis. 
 

Lyme Disease or Borreliosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Horses, Cows, Diseases

In the United States, Lyme Borreliosis is the most commonly-reported tick-transmitted disease in humans. Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi which is a spirochete (corkscrew-shaped bacteria) that is transmitted by various Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is also seen in Europe, Asia, South America, Africa and Australia.

Tularemia or Rabbit Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Diseases, Rabbits

A disease first described in a California ground squirrel around 1913, tularemia is also known as "rabbit" or "deerfly fever". The disease is caused by a gram-negative bacterium by the name of "Francisella tularensis". The bacterial septicemia may affect over 50 different species of wild and domestic mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and even man.

Rift Valley Fever

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases

Endemic to Madagascar, eastern, and southern Africa is an RNA disease causing virus named for the area in which it was first reported in 1930 called Rift Valley Fever (RVF). The virus has since been detected as far north as Egypt and over to the Arabian Peninsula countries of Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Although an important pathogen in its native area affecting domestic ruminants and people, RVF is feared as a potential biological weapon capable of spreading the globe by the movement of infected people, animals, and insects.

Vesicular Stomatitis in Horses, Cows, and Pigs

Filed Under: Horses, Cows, Diseases, Pigs

Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a viral disease of horses, cattle and swine that produces characteristic lesions known as vesicles and erosions. After a short incubation period of anywhere from 3 to 15 days, affected animals will have an elevated temperature, appear lethargic (depressed) and anorexic, and often exhibit drooling of saliva (ptyalism) and lameness.

Syndicate content