paralysis

Chytrid: a Deadly Fungus Threatens Endangered Amphibians

Filed Under: Reptiles, Parasites

The chytrid fungus, whose scientific name is Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is decimating amphibian populations worldwide, especially in Central America and Australia. The fungus has contributed to the extinction of nine frog species native to Australia and almost 200 species worldwide. When B. dendrobatidis affects a community, up to a 50% morbidity rate is seen in the native amphibian population and 80% of the affected animals will die within a one year period (mortality rate).

Proventricular Dilatation Disease (PDD)

Filed Under: Diseases, Birds

Proventricular Dilatation Disease, or PDD, is a disorder of the central nervous system and a fatal viral disease that currently affects 50 different species of domesticated and wild psittacine parrots as well as 5 other Orders of birds. PDD was previously known as “macaw wasting syndrome” when it was mistakenly thought to infect only macaws. The Spix’s macaw, whose current population is estimated at 100 live birds, is currently one of the most endangered species of birds in the world, with its very existence being threatened by PDD.

Azalea and Rhododendron Poisoning

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Horses, Cows, Poisoning

The beautiful flowering shrub adjacent to your porch may have a sinister side to it. Don’t let those colorful blooms fool you. Cuttings from these bushes may be toxic to your pets and livestock.

Oleander Toxicosis

Filed Under: Dogs, Horses, Poisoning

Oleander is an ornamental shrub that flowers in various colors including white, red, pink and violet. This plant is an evergreen perennial that flowers throughout the summer months. Originally a native plant of the Mediterranean, oleander is a very drought-tolerant ornamental. Oleander is now commonly found in warmer areas of the United States. It is often planted as an ornamental hedge along roads and gardens, although it is occasionally grown as a houseplant. The leaves are thick and leathery and vary from four to twelve inches in length.

Rabies in Cattle

Filed Under: Cows, Diseases

Does your cow appear to be choking? Think twice before extending your arm down the animal’s throat bare handed to look for a foreign body. One of the most common ways for ranchers, farmers, and veterinarians to be exposed to rabies is through exposure to a supposedly choked cow.

Rabies in Horses

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Rabies is a virus that may infect the central nervous system of any warm blooded animal. Rabies is typically spread by the saliva from infected animals. Horses are most likely to contract rabies by the bite of a wild carnivore, bats, or unvaccinated cats. Rabies is essentially 100% fatal once clinical signs attributed to the disease are exhibited.

In the year 2001 there were nearly 7,500 cases of rabies that were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. Of those cases, 51 were members of the Equine Family.

Ticks

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Ticks are essentially large mites that are covered with a leathery integument. A tick’s sole purpose is sucking blood from mammals, birds and reptiles, and then reproducing to provide the next generation. Ticks are not insects, but arachnids. An adult will have eight legs and three body segments. As arachnids, ticks are related to spiders, chiggers, scorpions and mites.

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