weight loss

Feline Lungworms

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Has your cat been coughing lately?  Have you noticed weight loss in your pet or periods with difficulty breathing?  You may be dealing with a parasitic infection rather than a respiratory disease, feline heartworms, or feline asthma.  Any cat with clinical signs of respiratory disease that is over 3 months of age should be screened for the feline lungworm, or Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, which is a nematode (type of roundworm) capable of infecting the lungs of cats. 
 

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Is your pet suddenly lame when you have seen no indication of trauma?  Have you recently removed ticks from your pet or are you late on your tick treatment this month?  Has your dog had any abnormal bleeding or are his joints swollen or painful?  Then you may want to consider the possibility that your dog could be suffering from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

Hookworms in the Dog

Filed Under: Dogs, Parasites

Is your puppy anemic? Does he appear to be losing weight, and is the hair coat dull and thinning? Have you noticed that your dog’s bowel movements are dark and tarry? Then your pet may be suffering from a hookworm infection.

Hookworms are small thread-like worms that suck blood from the small intestinal tract of infected pets. The most common types of hookworms infecting dogs include Ancylostoma caninum, Ancylostoma braziliense, and Uncinaria stenocephala.

Pythiosis in the Dog

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Has your dog been losing weight lately, exhibiting chronic vomiting, had diarrhea, or hematochezia (blood in the feces)? Alternatively, does your dog have an ulcerated, draining skin lesion that just won’t heal? Is your dog a sports breed like a Labrador retriever, or does he love the water? Do you live in an area with a warmer climate? Then your dog could be suffering from an infection called Pythiosis.

Canine Ehrlichiosis or Tropical Canine Pancytopenia

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Canine Ehrlichiosis is also known as tropical canine pancytopenia, canine typhus, canine hemorrhagic fever, idiopathic hemorrhagic syndrome, Nairobi bleeding disorder, canine rickettsiosis, and tracker dog disease. Ehrlichiosis is caused by obligate intracellular rickettsial organisms that parasitize thrombocytes (the precursor of platelets) of the animal affected. Platelets are important in the function of blood clotting.

Feline Hyperthyroidism: Thyroid Disorders in Cats

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline hyperthyroidism is a disease characterized by weight loss, increased appetite, higher energy levels and possible irritability. It is the most common endocrine disorder in cats.

Helicobacter Gastritis and Ulcers in the Ferret

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Ferrets are often kept as laboratory animals for the study of Helicobacter mustelae, a bacterium implicated in the development of gastritis and ulcers. Helicobacter species of bacteria have been implicated in disease production in various animals and man. Disease is usually associated with stress.

Stressful situations for the ferret may involve the introduction of a new ferret or pet to the home, moving to a new home, or lack of exercise and playtime when a ferret is constantly kenneled.

Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) or Swamp Fever is caused by a lentivirus of the family Retroviridae. This virus is transmitted primarily by blood-sucking insects, especially horseflies and deerflies. Transmission may also occur via contaminated syringes, surgical instruments or blood transfusions. Vertical transmission (transmission from mother to offspring) may occur transplacentally or via colostrum and nursing. The only known reservoirs of infection are members of the Equine Family. Virus replication does not occur in the insect vector.

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