necessary vaccinations

Canine Parvovirus

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Worried about the “New Parvovirus?”  Don’t be!  If your pet is adequately vaccinated for parvovirus, then they will be covered for the newer strain.  If your dog is not vaccinated for parvovirus, they can become infected with any strain of parvovirus, regardless of age.  So if your dog has not been vaccinated in the past year for parvovirus, see your veterinarian today!  Don’t delay!  It could mean the difference between the life and death for your four-legged friends.

Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA)

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases, General Care

Are you currently breeding horses? Are you vaccinating your horses for Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA)? A 2005 study found that a mere 11.7% of breeding operations are vaccinating for this highly contagious, reportable, viral disease that causes sporadic outbreaks of respiratory infection and abortion in horses.

Rabies in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Did you know that rabies is responsible for the death of one person worldwide every 10 minutes? Children are affected by rabies more than every other age group with approximately 100 children, primarily in Asia and Africa, dying each and every day. In the United States, where there are strict requirements for rabies vaccinations in domestic animals, we still diagnose, on average, from one to three cases of rabies in humans each year.

Feline Leukemia Virus

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Feline Leukemia is a retrovirus. As a member of the retrovirus family, the feline leukemia virus’s genetic material is transmitted as RNA. Once the virus infects the cell, DNA copies of the virus are transcribed and these copies are inserted randomly into the host’s genetic material. Once the DNA is integrated within the genome, any cell division that occurs will cause both of the new cells to contain the virus.

Kennel Cough

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Kennel Cough--or Infectious Tracheobronchitis--is an easily transmitted combination bacterial/viral disease in the canine patient. It is caused by a bacterial infection of Bordetella bronchiseptica and viral components parainfluenza and canine adenovirus. Tracheobronchitis is a highly infectious condition seen 5 to 10 days following exposure to the causative agents.

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