skin conditions

Mast Cell Tumors in the Dog: A New Hope

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Has your dog recently been diagnosed with a mast cell tumor?  Has your veterinarian given you a rather gloomy prognosis?  Take heart:  Pfizer Animal Health™ has a new chemotherapy drug coming out specifically for the treatment of mast cell tumors in the dog.  

Cheyletiellosis or Walking Dandruff in the Cat

Filed Under: Cats

Is your cat constantly scratching? Does he have scabby areas of hair loss? Does he have dandruff that you think may be moving? Then your cat could be suffering from cheyletiellosis.

Cheyletiellosis is a dermatologic condition caused by a mite so large that it is sometimes visible to the naked eye. The mite infecting cats is called Cheyletiella blakei. Although primarily a parasite of cats, cross-infections with dogs, rabbits, and foxes may occur.

Ferret Adrenal Gland Disease

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Diseases, Ferrets

Is your ferret losing hair and has skin that appears to be normal? Your pet may be suffering from ferret adrenal gland disease.

Histiocytomas

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Histiocytomas are benign, fast-growing, raised, hairless skin tumors found on the extremities, head, ears, and neck. Histiocytomas account for 3 to 14% of skin tumors occurring in the dog. Typically these lesions are round and less than three cm in diameter. These tumors occur most commonly in young dogs. Boxers, Dachshunds, Cocker spaniels, Great Danes, Shetland sheepdogs and Bull terriers are especially susceptible to histiocytomas. Often these tumors will resolve spontaneously within three months and may be multiple.

Hot Spots (Acute Moist Dermatitis)

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Have you ever had an itch that was driving you insane? You just could not leave it alone even though the skin was becoming irritated? You may even scratch at the area so bad that you caused it to bleed. Everyone was trying to advise you not to scratch and yet you somehow just could not leave it alone. Sounds like a pet with a hot spot, or “acute moist dermatitis.”

Are all white-haired animals albinos?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Horses, General Care

Albinism—the lack of pigment melanin in the skin, hair and eyes—is present in most animal species, but many animals with white coats are not albinos.

Albinos have a complete lack of color pigment. Most animals with white coats have brown eyes, or possibly one blue and one brown eye. The skin around the eyelids and lips may be quite dark, even black.

Though it is generally obvious in their appearance, your veterinarian will tell you if your animal is a true albino.

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