How to Get Rid of that Skunk Stink

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, General Care

Although skunks are lovable animals, we all know they have a very specific odor, and it's generally not pleasant. What do you do when a skunk leaves its mark on your pet? A few standard household products will take care of it.

The standard home recipe for the elimination of skunk spray is as follows:

1 quart of hydrogen peroxide
½ cup baking soda
drop of liquid dish detergent

The resulting solution will foam. Wash the offending area with the solution and rinse clean with warm water. Make sure you do not get the solution in your pet’s eyes.

An alternative formula is one part household white vinegar with 3 parts warm water.

Numerous commercial products are also available and have varying levels of success. Household items such as the ones listed above will always do the trick and are usually handy. Good luck!

Topics: skunks

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