Cats

Feline Trichomoniasis

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

If your cat has been suffering from chronic large bowel diarrhea and nothing seems to be working, don’t overlook trichomoniasis as a possible cause.  Feline trichomoniasis is an infection caused by the protozoal parasite Tritrichomonas foetus.  The infection is hard to diagnose and even harder to treat. 
 

Top 10 Cat-Friendly Cities in the United States 2009

Filed Under: Cats, General Care

According to the CATalyst Council, which is a coalition of veterinary, academic, nonprofit, pet industry, and animal welfare organizations, the top 10 cat-friendly cities in the United States for 2009 are:  Phoenix, AZ; San Francisco, CA; Portland, OR; Denver, CO; Boston, MA; Seattle, WA; San Diego, CA; Atlanta, GA; and Minneapolis, MN; with the friendliest city being Tampa, FL.

 
References:
 
“Top Cat Cities.”  Pet Age. June 2009. P. 10

Feline Lungworms

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Has your cat been coughing lately?  Have you noticed weight loss in your pet or periods with difficulty breathing?  You may be dealing with a parasitic infection rather than a respiratory disease, feline heartworms, or feline asthma.  Any cat with clinical signs of respiratory disease that is over 3 months of age should be screened for the feline lungworm, or Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, which is a nematode (type of roundworm) capable of infecting the lungs of cats. 
 

Why Do Dogs and Cats Eat Grass?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Behavioral & Training, Diet & Nutrition, General Care

The age old question for pet owners has been, “Why do dogs, who are largely carnivores, and cats, who are obligate carnivores, eat grass?”  Dogs and cats receive no nutritive value from grass.  So why do they consume greens, typically grasses?  Traditionally veterinarians and behaviorists have theorized that these pets are sick and need to vomit or have some perceived dietary deficiency that perhaps the owner is unaware of.  The answer may be more fundamental:  eating grass may be a necessary inherited predisposition of dogs and cats from their wild ancestors.  

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Is your pet suddenly lame when you have seen no indication of trauma?  Have you recently removed ticks from your pet or are you late on your tick treatment this month?  Has your dog had any abnormal bleeding or are his joints swollen or painful?  Then you may want to consider the possibility that your dog could be suffering from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

Cycas Revoluta: The Sago Palm, or Cycad Poisoning

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

Do you have a beautiful, full, dark green exotic palm tree as a houseplant? Do you have exotic palms as part of your landscaping? If you have pets or livestock that can access these plants you may want to rethink the use of them in your garden.

Periodontal Disease in the Dog and Cat

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diet & Nutrition, Diseases, General Care

Periodontal Disease is defined as an inflammation and/or infection of the gums and bone around the teeth. Periodontal disease is the most common disease found in the dog and will affect more than 8 out of 10 dogs three years of age and older. The prevalence of periodontal disease in the dog increases with age but also decreases with increasing body weight; therefore, toy and miniature breeds are more severely affected.

Aspirin or Acetylsalicylic Acid Poisoning in the Cat

Filed Under: Cats

Is your cat feeling a little under the weather? Think you might help him out by giving him half of an aspirin. Don’t! Aspirin may be toxic to your pet, especially your feline friends.

Rabies in Dogs and Cats

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Did you know that rabies is responsible for the death of one person worldwide every 10 minutes? Children are affected by rabies more than every other age group with approximately 100 children, primarily in Asia and Africa, dying each and every day. In the United States, where there are strict requirements for rabies vaccinations in domestic animals, we still diagnose, on average, from one to three cases of rabies in humans each year.

Saint Patrick's Day

Filed Under: Cats, Practice Stories

This year Saint Patrick’s Day was stormy - in fact the annual Irish parade was being postponed until Saturday. The employees at the clinic were catching up on some much needed spring cleaning and stocking. Rainy days often give you a chance to catch up on all the non-essential busy work you let slide when patients need your attention. Rainy weather outside usually means one of two things happen at the clinic: clients will bring their pets in for a bath or bring them in extremely sick.

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