Cats

Holistic Flea Control Strategies

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Did you know that vacuuming can be detrimental to the fleas in your pet’s environment? Cleaning the house may actually help you destroy pests. Ohio State University has studied the effects of vacuuming on the most common flea plaguing pets, the cat flea. Their study revealed that 96 percent of adult fleas and 100 % of younger fleas (pupae and larvae stages) were destroyed after passing through a vacuum cleaner.

Bufo Toads: Poisonous to Pets

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Poisoning

Think toads are harmless? Do you think it’s alright if your dog or cat decides on a frog-leg snack? If you live in a warmer part of the world you might just want to rethink your position. Especially large or colorful frogs may be hazardous to the health of your pets. In fact, toads were responsible for the 8th most common way pets were poisoned during 2007 in the United States.

Cat Scratch Fever or Cat Scratch Disease (CSD)

Filed Under: Cats, Diseases

Cat scratch fever or disease (CSD) is a bacterial infection caused by Bartonella henselae. Bartonella are a group of gram-negative bacteria that parasitize erythrocytes (red blood cells or RBCs) of the host and are transmitted by arthropods. Most people infected with cat scratch fever have been previously bitten or scratched by a cat. Cat bites are less frequently implemented in transmission than are scratches.

Cheyletiellosis or Walking Dandruff in the Cat

Filed Under: Cats

Is your cat constantly scratching? Does he have scabby areas of hair loss? Does he have dandruff that you think may be moving? Then your cat could be suffering from cheyletiellosis.

Cheyletiellosis is a dermatologic condition caused by a mite so large that it is sometimes visible to the naked eye. The mite infecting cats is called Cheyletiella blakei. Although primarily a parasite of cats, cross-infections with dogs, rabbits, and foxes may occur.

Pets and Flea Prevention

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Adult fleas are wingless, blood-sucking, external parasites of warm-blooded animals. The cat flea is the most common in the Southeast. It has more than fifty hosts, including domestic cats, dogs, opossums, cattle, skunks, squirrels, and the house mouse. From egg to adult, the cat flea can live up to twenty months indoors.

Distribution in the home

Habits of pets affect the distribution of fleas inside the house. Flea larvae are found primarily in carpeting near an area where a pet spends time sleeping or resting.
Suitable infestation sites:

Heat Stroke in Dogs, Cats, and Other Pets

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, General Care

Looking for a cool shady place with a cold drink to escape those warm summer temperatures? Maybe a dip in the pool or the lake will provide some relief. Some of us just hate to go outside the house during the middle of the day when we are fortunate enough to have an air-conditioner in those midsummer months. Just think of how bad it would be to have on a fur coat and have to pant to release excessive heat. Don’t forget your best 4-legged friends when trying to escape those dog days of summer. Your pets are more sensitive to heat stroke than you might think.

Feline Play Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

Excessively rough and persistent play is called play aggression. Play aggression amongst cats may create a problem when a very vivacious cat pounces on a less playful cat making that cat fearful or aggressive. Inadequate or inappropriate early socialization may be a contributing factor in the development of play aggression. Naturally, a mother cat tends to institute boundaries on what is considered to be acceptable “cat behavior.” Bottle-fed babies without a parental influence tend to be the worse offenders.

Feline Predatory Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

Predatory aggression concerns the natural instinct of cats to hunt. Cats in a predatory response may stalk silently crouching or in a slow walk, often followed by a short run. Hunting skills don’t necessarily need to be learned from their mother. Hunger is not a prerequisite for hunting but will certainly encourage the response. The natural prey of cats are rabbits, small rodents, insects, lizards, and birds.

Feline Fearful or Defensive Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

When threatened and afraid, any cat may become aggressive, especially when they cannot escape from the situation. Cats may become afraid of people when being reached for, cornered, or otherwise restrained. In general, the less stressed a feline is, the more tolerant it will be. Cats may become afraid of other cats as well as other animals in various circumstances. Illness may change the threshold for this response by making a cat more irritable.

Feline Territorial Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

Territorial aggression involves displays intended to exclude a cat from a particular area and often occurs when a new cat is introduced into a household. Individual cats may vary in their tolerance of other cats in the home. The introduction of a new cat to the household is easier when at least one of them is a kitten or juvenile. Assimilation is also easier when all the felines are well socialized to their own species.

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