Cats

Feline Aggression (General)

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

The second most commonly reported feline behavioral problem is that of aggression. It is estimated by behaviorists that aggression represents approximately 13% of their feline case load. The display of aggression in cats is influenced by the environment, heredity, and early experiences in the life of the cat.

A good medical examination by your veterinarian and history of the behavior in question are important to the diagnosis and treatment of the behavioral problem. Situations that create or contribute to the anxiety should be duly noted.

Feline Maternal Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

Queens may show aggressive behavior to toms before delivery of kittens as well as while kittens are suckling and dependent. Infanticide (killing of kittens) has been observed in free-roaming farm cats and it is possible that queens treat toms as potential predators.

Some queens, typically friendly to people, may be protective of their kittens in the presence of human intruders. This behavior typically subsides as the kittens become older.

References:

Beaver, Bonnie. Feline Behavior: A Guide for Veterinarians. W.B. Saunders Co. 1992. Pp. 97-115.

Feline Redirected Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

Redirected aggression occurs when an aroused cat in an aggressive state attacks a person or other animal that was not the original cause of the aggression. The original target has become inaccessible and the cat directs its attention to a new target or individual. An example would be where an outside cat visits the sliding glass doors to a home housing two additional cats. The two indoor cats typically get along but when aroused into a frenzy, due to exposure to the wandering outside cat, suddenly turn their aggression on one another or alternatively, a human in the area.

Feline Biting Aggression When Being Petted

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

One of the most frequent forms of cat aggression toward people is biting or scratching while being petted. This type of aggression often results from a mismatch between the owner’s and pet’s desire for physical contact. Warning signs may include twitching of the tail, restlessness, and “intention” bites where a cat moves as if to bite but doesn’t.

Feline Dominance or Competitive Aggression

Filed Under: Cats, Behavioral & Training

In any stable household environment cats will develop a hierarchy of personalities and form dominance relationships. Sometimes these relationships will be subtle while other times they may be problematic or worse. Often, the alpha cat is not aggressive unless challenged or while protecting desirable resources. Family members may suddenedly be in flux when a family member becomes deceased or a new family member is introduced. This may result in the remaining family members vying for dominance.

Azalea and Rhododendron Poisoning

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Horses, Cows, Poisoning

The beautiful flowering shrub adjacent to your porch may have a sinister side to it. Don’t let those colorful blooms fool you. Cuttings from these bushes may be toxic to your pets and livestock.

Heartworms in the Feline Patient

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Are there mosquitoes in your area? Have you ever been bitten by a mosquito? One mosquito bite and your cat can be affected by heartworm disease. It is just that easy for your cat to obtain this life-threatening infection. Fortunately, heartworm disease is completely preventable, yet less than 4% of the cats in the United States are given heartworm preventative on a regular basis.

Raw Food Diets for Cats and Dogs

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diet & Nutrition

Most pet owners feed their pets traditionally-prepared commercial food. Due in part to the recent pet food recall, more people are turning to home-prepared diets for their pets. Some individuals are now advocating raw meat diets that may be prepared at home or are commercially available.

Tularemia or Rabbit Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Diseases, Rabbits

A disease first described in a California ground squirrel around 1913, tularemia is also known as "rabbit" or "deerfly fever". The disease is caused by a gram-negative bacterium by the name of "Francisella tularensis". The bacterial septicemia may affect over 50 different species of wild and domestic mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and even man.

Milk Thistle: Treating Chronic Liver Problems and Diabetes

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Is your dog or cat suffering from liver failure, or have you just found out there is an elevation in their liver enzyme levels? Milk thistle, or an extract thereof, may prove to be helpful. In fact, milk thistle may help with that case of pancreatitis or diabetes. Milk thistle has also been found to have protective properties in those animals receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatments. In addition, milk thistle may slow down or stop the growth of certain tumors.

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