Cats

Heartworm Disease in the Cat

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Heartworms or Dirofilaria immitis are a spaghetti-type worm that will develop in the heart and lungs of an affected feline. Heartworm disease in cats was first reported in 1920’s both in Brazil and in the U.S. Domestic and exotic felines may all become infected. Heartworms affect male and female cats in equal numbers.

Ticks

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Ticks are essentially large mites that are covered with a leathery integument. A tick’s sole purpose is sucking blood from mammals, birds and reptiles, and then reproducing to provide the next generation. Ticks are not insects, but arachnids. An adult will have eight legs and three body segments. As arachnids, ticks are related to spiders, chiggers, scorpions and mites.

The Chemistry Behind the Skunk Smell Remedy

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Reptiles, General Care

Paul Krebaum developed a skunk spray remedy from common household items through his knowledge of chemistry. Routinely used in the treatment of pets, his recipe is as follows:

  • 1 quart 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • ¼ cup baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon liquid soap (usually Dawn detergent is suggested)

Receptors in your nose are very sensitive to sulfur in a low oxidation state. These same receptors are not sensitive to sulfur in a high oxidation state.

Hot Spots (Acute Moist Dermatitis)

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Parasites

Have you ever had an itch that was driving you insane? You just could not leave it alone even though the skin was becoming irritated? You may even scratch at the area so bad that you caused it to bleed. Everyone was trying to advise you not to scratch and yet you somehow just could not leave it alone. Sounds like a pet with a hot spot, or “acute moist dermatitis.”

Too Much of a Good Thing

Filed Under: Cats, Practice Stories

Opening up my own veterinary clinic was a challenging proposition. One of the nicer aspects of being an associate was the availability of a second opinion—often whether you wanted it or not. When you are a single practitioner faced with a complicated case, it’s sometimes frustrating not having another colleague to bounce things off of.

Retained Baby Teeth

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, General Care

If your pet doesn’t lose his baby teeth before the permanent teeth erupt, these retained teeth can cause serious problems for your pet’s dental health.

How to Trim Your Cat's Claws

Filed Under: Cats, General Care

Regular trimming of your cat’s claws will not only make your cat more comfortable, it will probably save you a few minor cuts and scrapes, too.

At a pet supply store you should be able to find a pair "guillotine-style" cat clippers. When using these clippers, the cat’s claw is poked through a hole on one side of the clipper, and a blade cuts through the nail on the other side. Standard human nail clippers will also work just fine.

Are all white-haired animals albinos?

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Pocket Pets, Horses, General Care

Albinism—the lack of pigment melanin in the skin, hair and eyes—is present in most animal species, but many animals with white coats are not albinos.

Albinos have a complete lack of color pigment. Most animals with white coats have brown eyes, or possibly one blue and one brown eye. The skin around the eyelids and lips may be quite dark, even black.

Though it is generally obvious in their appearance, your veterinarian will tell you if your animal is a true albino.

Heartworm Preventatives for Cats

Filed Under: Cats, Parasites

Currently there are two forms of heartworm preventative approved for use in the cat.

Cats - Outdoor Life vs. Indoor Safety

Filed Under: Cats, General Care

While many cat owners consider their pets "outside cats," the fact is that cats kept indoors are much safer and healthier than their outdoor counterparts.

Free-roaming cats are bound to come in contact with other cats. Parasites, like fleas or ringworm, can be transmitted through these interactions, as well as communicable and infectious diseases—feline leukemia, feline infectious peritonitis, upper respiratory infections and even feline immunodeficiency virus.

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