difficulty eating

Botulism in Horses

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Is your horse showing clinical signs of weakness?  Does your horse appear to have difficulty controlling movements of its tongue or show any other signs of dysphagia (difficulty eating)?  These may be the early warning signs that you horse is suffering from a toxin produced by a type of bacteria known as Clostridium botulinum
 

Rabies in Horses

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases

Rabies is a virus that may infect the central nervous system of any warm blooded animal. Rabies is typically spread by the saliva from infected animals. Horses are most likely to contract rabies by the bite of a wild carnivore, bats, or unvaccinated cats. Rabies is essentially 100% fatal once clinical signs attributed to the disease are exhibited.

In the year 2001 there were nearly 7,500 cases of rabies that were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. Of those cases, 51 were members of the Equine Family.

Oral Melanoma: Extended Survival Times

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Oral melanoma—a tumor found in the mouth of your dog—tends to be aggressive. These types of tumors are frequently malignant, and will spread throughout the body often before they are diagnosed. Luckily, routine yearly physical examinations can yield an early diagnosis.

Your Rodent's Dental Health

Filed Under: Pocket Pets, Chinchillas, Ferrets, General Care, Gerbils, Guinea Pigs, Hamsters, Mice, Rats

Small rodents have continually growing front teeth, worn down through normal chewing. If your rodent’s teeth are not wearing down naturally, it may be due to malocclusion. Malocclusion is a common dental disorder, found in rabbits and other small rodents, defined as abnormal contact between the maxillary (upper jaw) and mandibular (lower jaw) teeth. The misalignment of these teeth interferes with chewing. Causes of the misalignment include abnormal wear and tear—such as chewing on metal cages—or trauma to the teeth or head.

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