lameness

Canine Osteosarcoma

Filed Under: Dogs, Diseases

Does your dog have a swelling of the leg that is painful when touched?   Is your dog suddenly lame?  Can’t remember a traumatic incidence your pet has been subjected to recently?   Is your dog over 50 pounds in weight?  If the answer to most of these questions is yes, you should take your pet to his veterinarian.   Large and giant breeds of dogs are particularly susceptible to osteosarcoma which is a highly aggressive and malignant tumor or cancer of the bone.  Radiographs will clearly demonstrate if you have to be concerned about this type of tumor.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Filed Under: Dogs, Cats, Diseases

Is your pet suddenly lame when you have seen no indication of trauma?  Have you recently removed ticks from your pet or are you late on your tick treatment this month?  Has your dog had any abnormal bleeding or are his joints swollen or painful?  Then you may want to consider the possibility that your dog could be suffering from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

Canine Panosteitis or Eosinophilic Panosteitis

Filed Under: Dogs, Orthopedic

Is your dog limping? Does that limp appear to shift from one leg to another? Is your dog under two years of age and a large or giant-sized breed? Then your dog may be suffering from canine panosteitis or eosinophilic panosteitis.

Vesicular Stomatitis in Horses, Cows, and Pigs

Filed Under: Horses, Cows, Diseases, Pigs

Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a viral disease of horses, cattle and swine that produces characteristic lesions known as vesicles and erosions. After a short incubation period of anywhere from 3 to 15 days, affected animals will have an elevated temperature, appear lethargic (depressed) and anorexic, and often exhibit drooling of saliva (ptyalism) and lameness.

West Nile Encephalomyelitis in the Horse

Filed Under: Horses, Diseases, Parasites

West Nile virus (WNV) is a flavivirus that was first identified in Africa during 1937. WNV is considered to be endemic in Africa, Asia, Southern Europe and North America. The virus first appeared in North America around the New York City area in 1999, when wild and zoo birds, horses and humans died of meningoencephalitis. WNV has been found in 225 different wild and captive bird species. Birds are the natural host and reservoir of this virus.

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